International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST: NATALIE ANNE YOSTEN

 

Introduce yourself and your art.

My name is Natalie Anne Yosten, and my postcard is called Spirits Rising.

    

Where/How did you develop the idea for your postcard?

I was at my first Nebraska Husker Football game (American Football), and the balloons were released during half-time. It’s usually the time to get the home team reeved up for the next half of the game, or just to keep all the fans amused. It was a perfect moment, because the sun was about to set below the stadium. I took a picture on my Samsung Galaxy phone, right when the light was shimmering off the balloons as they rose to touch the light. It was a beautiful, exciting, and delightful moment! The crowd’s spirits seem to rise with the balloons all in a great cheer!

 

What  was your intention for your postcard?

To convey the beauty, passion, and spirit of the moment.

    

Is this your first exhibition and if yes, how do you feel about it?

This is my very first exhibition, and I’m extremely nervous and excited! To do it on an international level makes me nervous, because there are so many wonderous things in the world. If my work does okay, then I will be very pleased.

 

What was it about the subject/content of your postcard that enticed you?

It may be portrayed as whimsical or perceived a bit childishly, but I chose the balloons as a moment that could be from any part of the world. We all have events and festivals where joy is taken, and spirits rise in fervor to the music and the sounds from fellow participants! The world can be filled with horror, but for a moment it can be so light and beautiful!

 

Does your postcard have any connection to today’s world?

At the moment I would like to believe this would be an escaping moment most people in the world would cling to. Just a fleeting moment of joy, and I think we all try to hold the good times as long as we can. Keep them precious while we experience them, and as we try to recall them in memory. Our world is a grave place, and we all want to rise above the bad things.

 

What artists inspire you?

Well, I have always liked Josephine Wall’s Art, but for photography specifically I like Steve McCurry and Margaret Bourke-White.

 

What research do you do for your art works?

I will admit, I don’t research very much for my art work. When it comes to Photography I have become accustomed to just trying to capture the moment when I see a good one.

My inspiration usually comes when I am with friends, family, or in nature. I just snap a shot at what I think is good. I have learned about lighting, angles to pose in, and am trying to do more to create specific views. I still believe that many good shots happen on their own.

 

Do you have a creative routine/pattern?

No, I’m a hopeless amateur, and haven’t been able to get a good creative routine down. For now, I work off of the pressure of the deadline or by just being patient. Good times to take a photograph that doesn’t have to be edited are rare. I wait patiently, watching, camera in hand for those moments.

 

What are you trying to communicate with your postcard?

I try to convey with my postcards the feelings or thoughts that I have in the moment. I just hope that they are relatable enough for most people to understand. I prefer to take people out of their heads for a second, and make them see my point of view.

Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Spirits Rising 

Spirits Rising 

International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST: JAMES SUTTON

 

Introduce yourself and your art.

My name is James Sutton and this is my postcard 'Marble Black & White'.

 

Where/How did you develop the idea for your postcard?

I've been working on marbling techniques throughout 2016, in my flat where I make space for my art. This was done through numerous types of inks and paper, along with some digital cleaning up for the final outcomes.

 

What was your intention for your postcard?

The intention I guess is to look, difficult perhaps because of it's size. With marbling I always had the intention for viewers to look at the works and find shapes and ideas within them for themselves.

 

What was it about the subject/content of your postcard that enticed you?

Marbling has interested me for a while now, with the intricate details and experimental fragility it offers when you implement it. The idea of unknowing how the end piece will look always enticed me along with the details you find in the small spaces with marbling. Like worlds within worlds you can look at pieces again and again to find new parts that hold your eye.

 

What artists inspire you?

Artists that I look at a lot include Rene Almanza, Doze Green and Dave Kinsey to name some contemporary artists that I have come to follow much more lately. I follow things like Juxtapoz on Instagram along with more generic art forums that always show new and inspiring works. There's so much art out there on display nowadays with Instagram, Pinterest etc that show daily amazing things it's sometimes overwhelming, but always inspiring.

 

Do you have a creative routine/pattern?

My work has altered a lot as I look to create new ideas and expand in styles. It usually comes from drawing or painting stuff continuously, having breaks from work always brings new ideas and practises to the front. I wouldn't be sure on patterns but routines fall into researching ideas and talking to others, thankfully my local in Lincoln has a group of creative individuals that work and drink in there. When I create it's in my lounge with a dedicated area where I have music constantly on. Instrumental musical works that let you flow with creativity and don't distract.

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/1cosmicj/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/1cosmic_j/

Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Marble black and white

Marble black and white

Re:Surface : Interview with the artist

ARTIST: REBECCA PEAREY

 

What inspires you to create and does your work reflect this?

Nature normally inspires me to create my work, as I mostly draw animals and plants. I think my work definitely does reflect this however I'd like to broaden what I normally draw!

 

What medium do you primarily work

 I use fine liners of various sizes for my work.

 

 How do you work/create?

I create small, detailed illustrations in a pointillist style, or sometimes linework - almost like tattoo designs. I like to use small strokes or marks to create an overall much larger, detailed piece.

What do you like about your work?

I really like how detailed my work can be for someone who can be very, very impatient!

What do you see for you in the future?

In the future I'd love to be able to be a freelance illustrator selling my work and commissions part time, while working in the graphic design industry - however I'm not sure which field yet!

 

Explain what you do in 100 words

My piece(s) at Re:Surface are a collection of my favourite drawings I've done over the past year or so, showing the style I like to work in and what I sell on Etsy.

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Sam Lindley

Photo Credit: Sam Lindley

Re:Surface : Interview with the Artist

ARTIST: DOMINIQUE MITCHELL

 

What medium do you primarily work with and how did you get into it?

I work with all different types of yarn, alpaca, wool, cotton, acrylic - I like to experiment to see how the material affects the finished product in terms of density, fluidity, colour, size and texture. I constantly switch back and forth between crochet and knitting. It depends on what I am creating whether I crochet it or whether I knit it. 

I've always wanted to create but I was useless at drawing and painting - the traditional arts -and then during my second year I picked up a crochet hook sat in front of youtube and voila. I realised that I could express my creativity through the medium of yarn and I have never looked back.   

What will you be exhibiting at Re:Surface?

I am exhibiting two pieces in Re:Surface. One is an experimental crochet canvas adorned with brightly coloured flowers and quirky shapes. The other is a tubular knitted scarf that features patterns that I've used from around the internet and ones that I have designed myself. I started knitting this scarf in November 2015 whilst I was travelling in Romania. I wanted something to keep me busy on long coach rides or nights in at the hostel. I knitted throughout Romania, Bratislava, Vienna, Germany and Amsterdam and I'm still knitting it today. I don't think I want to finish. Ill just keep adding to it year after year letting it grow row by knitted row.  

What inspires you to create? 

I'm inspired by everything and anything - by colours in a sunset,  a conversation with a friend, a piece of art, an instagram post, a story. I'll note it down for future use. Sometimes I'm simply inspired by an emptiness that I want to fill, a space on my wall or a product that doesn't exist. Then I like to spend time sketching and designing to see how I could create something to fill that space.

 

What do you see for you in the future?

Over the next year I'm looking to develop myself and my work further by creating more pieces, functional and artistic. Developing my crochet and knitting skills by learning new and more complex techniques. I'd like to begin to work on larger 3D pieces and some items of clothing.

Keep In Touch

www.myotherloves.wordpress.com

Instagram: dominiquekmitchell

Photo Credit: Sam Lindley

Photo Credit: Sam Lindley

Re:Surface : Interview with the Artist

Artist: Phoebe Joy

 

What inspires you to create and does your work reflect this?

Whilst at university I came across the Blaschka's, a nineteenth century father and son duo who created replicas of flowers and sea creatures using glass. I was particularly taken by the models of microscopic sea creatures which are intricately detailed. Although I don't aim to create any particular specimen in particular, I create pieces that have a lot of fine and decorative detail in them.

 

How do you work/create?

I use a propane and oxygen torch flame to melt glass rods which I then apply to a glass or metal rod to create my designs. Each individual dot of glass has to be applied one at a time making every piece unique.

 

What do you like about your work?

Lampworking is a very relaxing craft, as you have to focus only on the twirling glass in front of you.

 

A few words about your piece at Re:Surface.

Some of my most delicate work, samples of microscopic sea creatures taken from larger models and framed to be displayed like museum artefacts.

Keep In Touch:

Email: Pj@phoebejoy.co.uk

Website: Phoebejoy.co.uk

Shop: Folksy.com/shops/phoebejoy

Facebook page: phoebe joy-lampwork glass maker

Instagram: phoebe_joy_lampwork

Video of me making: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_rGZ61dDhEU

 

photo: Sam Lindley

photo: Sam Lindley

Re:Surface: Interview with the Artist

 

Artist: Emily Geyerhosz

 

What inspires you to create and does your work reflect this?

With writing, I get inspired a lot by music, film, TV and books. I can be inspired by certain characters and certain exchanges between them and I can get inspired by sights or settings I may come across, which is what my piece is about. I was in awe of the weather one day on an annual family trip to the coast. The town, Whitby, is a place I’ve always come back to, since I was a child. The sea, the abbey, the pier, the cobbled streets have always been one of the settings I’ve been interested in. I’ve always been keen to take photos too, and this one day I took one that stood out from the rest and just became a representation of the beautiful day I’d had. I seem to rotate to these descriptions of coastal towns, and old towns with narrow cobbled streets. I really like to describe these settings as vividly as I can.

How do you work/create?

I mostly end up writing when I’m not supposed to, like when I need to be studying. I come up with ideas usually when I’m travelling or walking whilst listening to music and I then try to write about certain images or extracts of a scene I’ve thought up and form backgrounds or plots later on. But, generally, I generally don’t really have a plan with how I write, though it can depend on what I’m writing. I like to sit down with a notepad and pen or my laptop and write for a while and then read back over it.

What do you like about your work?

I like that it is a physical copy of what I’ve been thinking about and I like translating thoughts into words. It can be difficult to not attack your work because of your inner critic, and it can also be hard to keep on rewording, cutting and changing and sometimes scrapping your ideas, but getting through that is very rewarding. Writing is a really good creative outlet, which is probably why I do end up writing when I’m supposed to be studying because it’s hard to absorb facts or information all the time as a creative person.

With the photography side of it, I have always liked the idea of being able to take a physical copy of something ephemeral- that cliche idea of capturing something forever is quite inspiring. There isn’t any skill behind the photos that I take at all, I just like the idea of photo albums and flicking through memories some of which encourage me to write.

What do you see for you in the future?

I’d love just to be able to write more in the future, either towards a big project like a novel or even smaller things like a creative journal or something that I would write everyday. Finding time to read and write for entertainment is hard now as a student as you always think you need to be getting on with uni work when you’re engaging your brain creatively instead of passively watching TV as a form of taking a break from studying. I’ve also always wanted to write and publish a book and keep up with a blog, and hopefully I will when things settle down.

A few words about your piece at Re:Surface.

I wanted to recreate the image of the Whitby Bay pier in words as it was a remarkable sight and a piece of photography I’m proud of. The photograph was taken around two years ago. I wanted to mash together my love of writing and my hobby of photography. What I hoped people would take from the piece was the idea of how writers can paint a picture, to rather capture a picture using words, which is something I find really intriguing with writing creatively. The aim was that people would read the description and then see if the photography matched up to the image painted in their head. I used pages of a book to cover to the box I’d placed the photography in to go with the idea of words mixing up with images and the conflict I can experience in my head with lots of different words and descriptions colliding together to try and describe something.

 

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