International Postcard Show: Set Up

We're nearly ready.

Here at Surface Gallery we are buzzing away painting, sweeping, mopping, curating, folding, hammering, nailing, sanding, typing, photographing, organising and, of course, drinking copious amounts of tea in order to get the International Postcard Show all set up and ready to go for opening night which is this Friday 13th at 6pm.

The International Postcard Show 2017 features over 460 unique pieces of art from artists all over the world. From over the road in Sneinton, Nottingham to the other side of the planet in Western Australia to just over the channel in the Netherlands. 

Opening night will be an opportunity to grab a beer or a glass of wine, chat with artists and other locals whilst perusing these fabulous mini-masterpieces. Some of these mini-masterpieces are for sale and would make fantastic gifts or the start of a budding art collection!

We look forward to seeing you!

 

A tweet treat

A tweet treat

Beginning to curate the postcards

Beginning to curate the postcards

Applying the finishing touches

Applying the finishing touches

Getting all those shelves up.

Getting all those shelves up.

Rows upon rows of mini-masterpieces.

Rows upon rows of mini-masterpieces.

Written by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Re:Surface : Interview with the artist

ARTIST: PETE ABRAHART

 

What inspires you to create and does your work reflect this?

My paintings come from my love of music and the heroes and icons I hold dear to my heart.

 

How do you work/create?

I have two areas of work - acrylic and collage icon paintings and biro/correction fluid scribbles

 

Explain what you do in 100 words.

I paint my portraits on A3 card, mostly in black and white and then collage them against a 16x20" art board with brown paper frame. After this I give the artboard a distressed effect with acrylic paint. I also distress the brown paper frame either with water and paint and then tear in to the frame or simply distress it with black acrylic paint depending on the musical artist and their life. I like to give each one a separate colour background that I feel represents them in some way also. I guess this is just a form of double framing and image.

 

What do you like about your work?

I like how my paintings are not just simply straight portraits - each one has it's own personality and double framing to bring it to life. This is something I don't plan for and although the black and white portrait itself is highly planned and measured the background and frame is very much an organic process.

 

What do you see for you in the future?

I think probably more of the same to be honest. I'm only really a hobby painter but love the work I produce. I always paint with the thought in mind that if I don't sell the pieces I produce I'm more than happy to hang them in my own home! My work also gets me some commission work too which is really a boost for my enthusiasm in creating work.

 

A few words about your piece at Re:Surface.

 

My seven pieces at Re:Surface represent the past six months of my life and work but my favourite being "Silent Sense of Content" the Amy Winehouse portrait - this piece was to commemorate five years since her death on the 23rd July. I wrote lyrics from my favourite song of hers around the outside and slightly changed some of the words to make it more personal to me. Amy Winehouse is someone I had the pleasure to meet many years back and I feel it is the most important piece in my collection as my own personal tribute.

 

 

photo: Sam Lindley

photo: Sam Lindley

Re:Surface : Interview with the Artist

Artist: Phoebe Joy

 

What inspires you to create and does your work reflect this?

Whilst at university I came across the Blaschka's, a nineteenth century father and son duo who created replicas of flowers and sea creatures using glass. I was particularly taken by the models of microscopic sea creatures which are intricately detailed. Although I don't aim to create any particular specimen in particular, I create pieces that have a lot of fine and decorative detail in them.

 

How do you work/create?

I use a propane and oxygen torch flame to melt glass rods which I then apply to a glass or metal rod to create my designs. Each individual dot of glass has to be applied one at a time making every piece unique.

 

What do you like about your work?

Lampworking is a very relaxing craft, as you have to focus only on the twirling glass in front of you.

 

A few words about your piece at Re:Surface.

Some of my most delicate work, samples of microscopic sea creatures taken from larger models and framed to be displayed like museum artefacts.

Keep In Touch:

Email: Pj@phoebejoy.co.uk

Website: Phoebejoy.co.uk

Shop: Folksy.com/shops/phoebejoy

Facebook page: phoebe joy-lampwork glass maker

Instagram: phoebe_joy_lampwork

Video of me making: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_rGZ61dDhEU

 

photo: Sam Lindley

photo: Sam Lindley

Re:Surface: Interview with the Artist

 

Artist: Emily Geyerhosz

 

What inspires you to create and does your work reflect this?

With writing, I get inspired a lot by music, film, TV and books. I can be inspired by certain characters and certain exchanges between them and I can get inspired by sights or settings I may come across, which is what my piece is about. I was in awe of the weather one day on an annual family trip to the coast. The town, Whitby, is a place I’ve always come back to, since I was a child. The sea, the abbey, the pier, the cobbled streets have always been one of the settings I’ve been interested in. I’ve always been keen to take photos too, and this one day I took one that stood out from the rest and just became a representation of the beautiful day I’d had. I seem to rotate to these descriptions of coastal towns, and old towns with narrow cobbled streets. I really like to describe these settings as vividly as I can.

How do you work/create?

I mostly end up writing when I’m not supposed to, like when I need to be studying. I come up with ideas usually when I’m travelling or walking whilst listening to music and I then try to write about certain images or extracts of a scene I’ve thought up and form backgrounds or plots later on. But, generally, I generally don’t really have a plan with how I write, though it can depend on what I’m writing. I like to sit down with a notepad and pen or my laptop and write for a while and then read back over it.

What do you like about your work?

I like that it is a physical copy of what I’ve been thinking about and I like translating thoughts into words. It can be difficult to not attack your work because of your inner critic, and it can also be hard to keep on rewording, cutting and changing and sometimes scrapping your ideas, but getting through that is very rewarding. Writing is a really good creative outlet, which is probably why I do end up writing when I’m supposed to be studying because it’s hard to absorb facts or information all the time as a creative person.

With the photography side of it, I have always liked the idea of being able to take a physical copy of something ephemeral- that cliche idea of capturing something forever is quite inspiring. There isn’t any skill behind the photos that I take at all, I just like the idea of photo albums and flicking through memories some of which encourage me to write.

What do you see for you in the future?

I’d love just to be able to write more in the future, either towards a big project like a novel or even smaller things like a creative journal or something that I would write everyday. Finding time to read and write for entertainment is hard now as a student as you always think you need to be getting on with uni work when you’re engaging your brain creatively instead of passively watching TV as a form of taking a break from studying. I’ve also always wanted to write and publish a book and keep up with a blog, and hopefully I will when things settle down.

A few words about your piece at Re:Surface.

I wanted to recreate the image of the Whitby Bay pier in words as it was a remarkable sight and a piece of photography I’m proud of. The photograph was taken around two years ago. I wanted to mash together my love of writing and my hobby of photography. What I hoped people would take from the piece was the idea of how writers can paint a picture, to rather capture a picture using words, which is something I find really intriguing with writing creatively. The aim was that people would read the description and then see if the photography matched up to the image painted in their head. I used pages of a book to cover to the box I’d placed the photography in to go with the idea of words mixing up with images and the conflict I can experience in my head with lots of different words and descriptions colliding together to try and describe something.

 

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