International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST: NICKI MCNANEY

I lecture at the University of Derby in Illustration and set up the Wooden Dog Press with my friend & colleague, illustrator, Richard Levesley, to document some of our professional practice and to share our common interest in drawing, storytelling, and printmaking.

The Night Siren print derived from an artist book I have been creating for the Pages Book Fair 2017, Leeds which initially was inspired by the title “ Mermaids are Always Welcome” and the curious nature of the mythical creaturese and lure of the mermaids to sea fairing sailors. I am interested in creating a backstory and narrative to even a simple illustration and hope that the audience will also create their own interpretation of what they feel the characters and environments communicate.

My work consists of a series of personal and collaborative illustration projects in which I investigate aspects of artifacts, collections, curation and curiosity. My most recent work creates visual hybrids where one element is shown in proximity or even blended with another object or character. I invite people to consider their own narrative and to react to what they are shown. My work aims to create curiosity from the ordinary and less seen. I test the notion that the collection of objects, character and the environment they exist in, is thought provoking and that narrative value is subjective.

I prefer to work in silkscreen, mono-print and collage, as the processes offer the opportunity to create textures, mark making and layering of colour that I seek to enhance the uniqueness and individuality of the publications and the final prints. I am interested in challenging traditional processes and exploring their application in artists book, print and in this case the postcard format.

 

Website: www.woodendogpress.ac.uk

Website: http://www.derby.ac.uk

Twitter @derbyillustrate

Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST:: ADAM BRANT

 

Introduce yourself and your art.

I’m a visual artist specialising in painting and drawing.  My work explores the relationship between the past, present and future.  I’m influenced by the tradition of still-life painting, and use objects and environments as starting-points to create images which investigate space and time.

 

I graduated with a Fine Art degree in 2002 from the University of Hull (Scarborough Campus).  I can recommend studying by the seaside – it’s as fun as it sounds!

 

During my studies I was lucky enough to spend a month at the Cyprus College of Art as part of a student exchange programme.  Finding inspiration in the ways the modern world impacted the ancient history of the island helped me to establish my identity as an artist.

 

My art practice can generally be divided into two work streams:

-  Conceptual series of work created in response to a theme (over months and years)

- Observational one-off work created in response to an object or image (over a few days).

 

Where/How did you develop the idea for your postcard?

‘Taut’ was inspired by receiving a Spirograph set as a Christmas present.  I often receive art related gifts (including art materials and books, as well as completely unexpected items such as an Etch A Sketch and the Spirograph!).

 

The idea for the postcard developed after seeing the Spirograph back in the art studio alongside other more traditional artist materials.

 

What was your intention for your postcard?

Over recent years I’ve been exploring different ways to combine painting and drawing within a single art work.  The intention was to challenge myself to use the Spirograph as the starting-point for the postcard as part of this exploration.  I didn’t use a Spirograph when I was young (I’m discounting trying out my sisters when she wasn’t looking!), so the aim was to see what I could make out of my unskilled efforts in using this new tool.

 

Is this your first exhibition and if yes, how do you feel about it?

This is not my first exhibition, but it is the first time my work is being exhibited in 2017!  It’s always exciting to be involved in a group show and see your art alongside the work of others.  It’s also a great way to connect with like-minded and supportive creative people.

 

My work has been exhibited in various locations across the UK, as well as in Norway and America (and is currently more well-travelled than I am!).

 

It can be daunting getting your work out there. I’ve been both successful and unsuccessful when submitting work for exhibition.  My advice to anybody creating art work is:

-  Do it because you love it.  If your work becomes recognised and appreciated by others that is great, but don’t let be the reason you produce work

-  Don’t be disillusioned if your work isn’t always successful.  Learn from previous experiences and stay inspired – you never know what exciting opportunities that next piece of work might lead you to…

 

Does your postcard have any connection to today’s world?

My work expresses experiences of space and time, and how these experiences impact how we connect to the world around us.

 

I join objects that already exist in the world from the past and present together for the first time.  By expressing my personal response to that connection, a new object is created with its own future in the world.  ‘Taut’ is no exception and represents:

-  The past (a plastic monster figure collected from a cereal box as a child)

-  The present (the Spirograph received as a Christmas present)

- The future (the postcard itself).

 

What artists inspire you?

I’m inspired by many different artists but if I had to pick one it would have to be Jenny Saville.  You can get a sense of the history of painting within Saville’s work so it also reminds me of other artists who inspire me such as Seventeenth century Dutch still-life painters, Picasso, and Lucien Freud.

 

The commitment of Saville to painting and drawing techniques fascinates me.  I treated myself to an expensive book about her work many years ago (I couldn’t really afford at the time, but it was a great investment). It has fantastic close-up photographs of the brushwork within her paintings.

 

I always turn to this book whenever something isn’t going well with my own work, and it usually leads me to resolving whatever artistic challenge I was facing.

 

What research do you do for your art works?

Research for my art work tends to be focused on local history, supernatural phenomenon, and my day-to-date interactions with the world around me.  This informs the theory of my work and provides visual inspiration.

 

My methods of researching vary - from looking-up information on the intranet, to visiting local libraries, to taking photographs of places I visit.

 

I love stationery so have more notebooks than is necessary to write down ideas and record information.  I tend to capture visual research information using a digital or phone camera as it is so convenient.  These have gradually replaced keeping a more traditional sketchbook.

 

I aspire to get back to keeping a sketchbook as they are a great archive of source material (I still refer to ideas from sketchbooks I created during my student days).

 

Do you have a creative routine/pattern?

I have a full-time office job to ensure the bills are paid so my art practice is planned around this.  It can be challenging juggling work, family and social commitments with time spent in the art studio.  Finding a healthy balance isn’t always easy.

 

I try to ensure I have a balanced schedule of time in the studio with time spent away from my art work.  Despite this I do still sometimes fall victim to deadline pressures (and have been known to stay up for 24 hours to get an art work finished!).

 

In the past I would feel guilty about not producing art work at every opportunity.  Now I have a more realistic routine of making sure I do at least one activity related to my art practice each day.  This can range from:

-  A few minutes spent updating my website or social media pages

-  A few hours spent researching concepts or sketching out ideas

-  A whole a day spent totally absorbed in painting a canvas.

 

It’s amazing what progress can be made from even doing only one task each day.

 

What are you trying to communicate with your postcard?

There isn’t a specific message I hope to communicate with ‘Taut’, but hope people can relate to the postcard in some way whether that be:

- Recalling memories of using a Spirograph

-  Wondering what the drawn figure and colours represent

-  Thinking about how the ink and paint has been applied to the paper.

 

I often use one-word titles to suggest rather than describe what the work expresses about my own experiences.  I hope people can take away something from my work that makes them challenge and reconsider their preconceptions.

 

You can discover more about my work via the following links:

Website: www.adambrant.co.uk

Facebook: Adam Brant – visual artist (www.facebook.com/abrantartist/)

Twitter: @brantus (www.twitter.com/brantus)

Instagram: @a_brant_artist (www.instagram.com/a_brant_artist)

International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST: NATALIE ANNE YOSTEN

 

Introduce yourself and your art.

My name is Natalie Anne Yosten, and my postcard is called Spirits Rising.

    

Where/How did you develop the idea for your postcard?

I was at my first Nebraska Husker Football game (American Football), and the balloons were released during half-time. It’s usually the time to get the home team reeved up for the next half of the game, or just to keep all the fans amused. It was a perfect moment, because the sun was about to set below the stadium. I took a picture on my Samsung Galaxy phone, right when the light was shimmering off the balloons as they rose to touch the light. It was a beautiful, exciting, and delightful moment! The crowd’s spirits seem to rise with the balloons all in a great cheer!

 

What  was your intention for your postcard?

To convey the beauty, passion, and spirit of the moment.

    

Is this your first exhibition and if yes, how do you feel about it?

This is my very first exhibition, and I’m extremely nervous and excited! To do it on an international level makes me nervous, because there are so many wonderous things in the world. If my work does okay, then I will be very pleased.

 

What was it about the subject/content of your postcard that enticed you?

It may be portrayed as whimsical or perceived a bit childishly, but I chose the balloons as a moment that could be from any part of the world. We all have events and festivals where joy is taken, and spirits rise in fervor to the music and the sounds from fellow participants! The world can be filled with horror, but for a moment it can be so light and beautiful!

 

Does your postcard have any connection to today’s world?

At the moment I would like to believe this would be an escaping moment most people in the world would cling to. Just a fleeting moment of joy, and I think we all try to hold the good times as long as we can. Keep them precious while we experience them, and as we try to recall them in memory. Our world is a grave place, and we all want to rise above the bad things.

 

What artists inspire you?

Well, I have always liked Josephine Wall’s Art, but for photography specifically I like Steve McCurry and Margaret Bourke-White.

 

What research do you do for your art works?

I will admit, I don’t research very much for my art work. When it comes to Photography I have become accustomed to just trying to capture the moment when I see a good one.

My inspiration usually comes when I am with friends, family, or in nature. I just snap a shot at what I think is good. I have learned about lighting, angles to pose in, and am trying to do more to create specific views. I still believe that many good shots happen on their own.

 

Do you have a creative routine/pattern?

No, I’m a hopeless amateur, and haven’t been able to get a good creative routine down. For now, I work off of the pressure of the deadline or by just being patient. Good times to take a photograph that doesn’t have to be edited are rare. I wait patiently, watching, camera in hand for those moments.

 

What are you trying to communicate with your postcard?

I try to convey with my postcards the feelings or thoughts that I have in the moment. I just hope that they are relatable enough for most people to understand. I prefer to take people out of their heads for a second, and make them see my point of view.

Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Spirits Rising 

Spirits Rising 

International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST: JENNIFER YIP

 

  I am a Year 2 Fine Art student of the University of Lincoln. My artworks centred around the beauty of everyday life and specific colours of cities. Through a delicate style of drawing and painting, my works aimed to capture a particular moment in our daily lives, as well as to raise people’s awareness to every object and scenery which we sometimes overlooked.

 

 As an international student studying in the UK, I often yearn to be home, Hong Kong. It was perhaps of the feeling of homesickness which inspired the idea of my postcard. The particular use of bright colours may be related to the famous night view of Hong Kong, as well as to link with personal experiences and memories.

 

Following the rapid development of our surroundings, fast-paced living habits appeared to dominate our everyday lives. By focusing on unnoticeable characteristics and features of a local area, I would like to remind, as well to encourage our society to pause and admire the pleasantness of every objects or scenery.

 

It is my first time to participate in an exhibition and I am feeling very excited about it. Not only does the exhibition offer me a chance to share my artwork with a wider audience, but as well to be involved in opportunities of a professional context, which may help in building up confidence and gaining experiences.

 

As my artworks relate to themes such as everyday lives and memories, all illustrations of scenes involved the process of visiting different places in person. During conversations with the local people, it allowed a better understanding of the area and its surroundings. With more knowledge of the background and history of site, a more suitable choice of media may be used to demonstrate a better representation.

Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Treasure Hunt, Hong Kong

Treasure Hunt, Hong Kong

International Postcard Show: Artist Interview

ARTIST: ROSA QUINTANA

 

Introduce yourself and your art.

I am a multi disciplinary visual artist based out of Vancouver, Canada but originally from South America. My work encompasses self motivated research into art history and the history of extinctions, specifically the extinctions of birds. And of course the present day discourse of environmental and political issues that pertain to my own backyard, the north west coast of north America.

 

Where/How did you develop the idea for your postcard?

The idea for the postcard this year comes from an ongoing series of work in my studio. It has in mind questions and concerns about the state of the oceans, climate change and design aspects.

 

What was your intention for your postcard?

The postcard sent is part of my ongoing Apocalypse Now series which varies in size. The intention in this postcard is to point out one idea or one concept, to focus and streamline a thought process.

 

 Is this your first exhibition and if yes, how do you feel about it?

This is my 3rd year submitting postcards to this show, I have been exhibiting in Canada and abroad for approx 25 years.

 

What was it about the subject/content of your postcard that enticed you?

I have been experimenting with more graphic visuals as oppose to expressionistic approaches to my work to convey a cleaner and at times more ambiguous conceptual message.

 

Does your postcard have any connection to today’s world?

Yes, this postcard is my very much about today’s world and all its trouble and beauty at the same time.

 

What artists inspire you?

Francis Bacon, Demian Flores, Bill Reid, Diego Rivera, Bosch, Picasso, Brigitte Riley, Brian Yungen, the list is actually uncountable. I would like to think that there is something in most art works that can be inspiring and that I can learn from. The courage and perseverance it takes to produce and finish an art work is inspiring in itself.

 

What research do you do for your art works?

Museums and libraries are my weakness, my favorite things are to leaf through large pictorial books and view historical and biographical artist documentaries.

 

Do you have a creative routine/pattern?

My goal is to spend at least 4  hours and up to 12 hours in the studio as many days of the week as possible, painting or researching or studying a subject or artists work.

 

What are you trying to communicate with your postcard?

This postcard in particular is playing with visual concepts and graphic representation. Maybe I am trying to make sure everyone knows that there are still killer whales out there and that there is still hope.

 

Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Apocalypse Now #4 After A Killer Whale

Apocalypse Now #4 After A Killer Whale

International Postcard Show:: Artist Interview

ARTIST:: Jake Francis

 

What was the intention for your postcard?

To terrorise, then humour, then mourn, then move on, then think about joining one of those dating sites with the free trial.

Where/How did you develop the idea for your postcard?

The idea came from the unfortunate truths of today’s national media and the manipulation within it. In each map, the perceived ‘priorities’ of that country are exacerbated and visualised - depicting the fickle and jaded output of our so called ‘informers’.

Introduce yourself and your art.

My art is the visual embodiment of the phrase ‘nice try’ - it is very much the weak air freshener to my inadequacy - the bog brush to my skidmarks.

Does your postcard have any connection to today’s world?

Unfortunately, yes.

What artists inspire you?

I take much of my inspiration from comedians and authors - writers like Chris Morris and Ryan Holiday have a way of recording the horrors of our modern culture without stagnation and dilution. We should know the disgraces of our media, but not without a rightful giggle.

Do you have a creative routine/pattern?

My ideas come to fruition around 10 am each morning - ironically the same time I have a bowel movement.  


Interview by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Priorities: ISIS

Priorities: ISIS

International Postcard Show: Set Up

We're nearly ready.

Here at Surface Gallery we are buzzing away painting, sweeping, mopping, curating, folding, hammering, nailing, sanding, typing, photographing, organising and, of course, drinking copious amounts of tea in order to get the International Postcard Show all set up and ready to go for opening night which is this Friday 13th at 6pm.

The International Postcard Show 2017 features over 460 unique pieces of art from artists all over the world. From over the road in Sneinton, Nottingham to the other side of the planet in Western Australia to just over the channel in the Netherlands. 

Opening night will be an opportunity to grab a beer or a glass of wine, chat with artists and other locals whilst perusing these fabulous mini-masterpieces. Some of these mini-masterpieces are for sale and would make fantastic gifts or the start of a budding art collection!

We look forward to seeing you!

 

A tweet treat

A tweet treat

Beginning to curate the postcards

Beginning to curate the postcards

Applying the finishing touches

Applying the finishing touches

Getting all those shelves up.

Getting all those shelves up.

Rows upon rows of mini-masterpieces.

Rows upon rows of mini-masterpieces.

Written by Dominique Mitchell (Writer in Residence)

Nine: A Look Beneath the Surface

This month our resident Studio Artists have dusted off their paints, prints and cameras and selected the best pieces of their current projects, created in their studios just above the gallery, for their annual in-house exhibition.

In 2013 the Studio Artists joined as 'Eight'. Since then spaces have swapped hands and some of the artists have moved out of Surface Gallery’s studios and onto new projects and activities. This year, a collaboration of nine current and previous resident Artists have opened their part-time home and gallery, showcasing the diverse work and the breadth of talent in a multi-faceted exhibition including photography, printmaking, paint and Yoda...

Launched Friday 25th July, Nine will be open to the public until the 9th August – alongside this, exhibiting artist Paul Henegan is sharing the exploration of print in his own practice through a number of open workshops on Saturday 2nd August - He has been teaching for many years and has run several successful print workshops in the past, so come along, have some fun, see if you're up-to-scratch and produce some prints to take home...even stick them on your fridge!

One of Paul Henegan's prints in 'Nine'.

One of Paul Henegan's prints in 'Nine'.

A cheeky peek at Paul's studio space, which he shares with wife, Gerry.

A cheeky peek at Paul's studio space, which he shares with wife, Gerry.

Along with Paul's print work, our Artists work with photography, printmaking, mixed-media installation and sculptural tableau. One of our other longstanding artists Ian Cutmore is displaying his current project work – Through the medium of photography, Ian explores his interest in landscapes through the 'fleeting, contingent imagery observed while travelling'.

Part of Ian Cutmore's space in 'Nine'.

Part of Ian Cutmore's space in 'Nine'.

Your final sneek peak...is the work of resident Jade Yasmin How. Jade's 'Materials of choice' are “Pen, photoshop, sewing machines, digital printing, neoprene and Cork material”. In Nine, she presents elegant and simple linework which contains an in depth context of what she calls “simple pleasures” and “sensory desires” of “tatlie humanity”. Now that was a mouthful.

Jade Yasmin How - Milk & Honey

Jade Yasmin How - Milk & Honey

Jade & Charlotte's artsy/shabby-chic studio space.

Jade & Charlotte's artsy/shabby-chic studio space.

There is still plenty of time to learn more about our wonderful Nine artists, so come along to Surface and see their exhibition in the flesh! This is an annual event showcasing the artists that make Surface what it is - one not to be missed!

Exhibition open until 9th August 2014.

 

TUESDAY TO FRIDAY 1200 - 1800
SATURDAY 1100 - 1700

Workshops:
Saturday 2nd August.
11am-12pm, 1pm- 2pm, 2.15pm-3.15pm
Children & Families: all ages welcome. £2.50 per person.
Booking is advisable as spaces are limited. Please contact us to reserve your place: surfacegallery@gmail.com

 

Written by Megan Bonser, Surface Gallery Volunteer.